Category Archives: Fiction

EDC: travelling in the UK

I’ve just come back from what used to be the family home, a trip to work on probate issues. It’s almost a seven hour journey each way, and on a trip like that there’s a fine balance between taking normal prepper-type precautions and weighing yourself down with kit that you’ll never need.

I took the train both ways this time, though sometimes I do it by car. So, as well as taking the things I need normally to flourish – toothpaste and dental floss, changes of clothing including a good fleece and a waterproof, my kindle, all that sort of thing, what do I take with me?

  • my keyring has some gizmos on: seatbelt cutter, a little 1” spyderco knife, a sturdy metallic whistle, an extremely sturdy, fierce-looking bottle opener in the shape of a shark, that has several uses.  I have a link below to a spyderco knife – bigger than mine, but recognisably the same line.

  • snacks. As well as my own food (intolerances of all sorts make this the best option) I carry snacks – usually oatcakes and dried fruit.

  • an all-metal pen, and a handy size anti-perspirant bottle sit ready for use, right by my antibacterial handgel.

  • a torch. I have a tiny 3” long thing, absolutely wonderful.

  • matches. Just because.

  • as much water as I’m comfortable carrying, usually only a litre, in two bottles.

  • extra cash, as much as I can stash away, in several different places.

  • there’s a tiny first aid kit, plasters, ibuprofen blah blah, nothing special. I confess, I do also put some water purification tabs in there when I’m travelling long distances.

  • toilet paper! It doesn’t need the end of the world for a UK train to run out of toilet paper.

  • a compass.

  • a windup radio.

For the last two, in particular, I have to thank Jenny Sutherland, one of the female protagonists in Last Light, Alex Scarrow’s brilliant book. Hundreds of thousands of us are en route to or from somewhere every day, and chaos, even temporary chaos, doesn’t wait for us to get safely where we’re going. Prepping gives us all a helping hand in those situations.

These are links to the most common sorts of kit that can genuinely increase your ability to survive and prosper, whatever gets thrown at you.   There’s also quite a lot of fun to be had with these: not just the reading, but the whittling with the knife, the fiddling about with the radio to listen to unusual channels, and playing endlessly with the torch.

For the return journey, my brother drove a van full of the stuff I went up there to sort and fetch – family papers and photos I’m taking care of, a patchwork quilt, my duvet, a couple of dining room chairs, some vintage glassware. He was also carrying my trolley case, and before the journey I was a bit concerned about not having my (very basic) preps with me on a seven hour which includes crossing London. But the above list of absolute essentials is so little, I could actually carry them in a day rucksack, and let the trolley case be used for boxes of the more fragile things. That was a win-win.

I know plenty of people online who’d be horrified at how short the above list is – and yes, there are some scenarios where, if I only had what was on this list, I’d be in trouble. But if prepping is also about attitude and thoughtfulness, then I’m good. I’ve taken calculated risks all my life, and they always work out, always – in the sense that if the bad thing happens, I can cope well enough with what I’ve got on hand, and adjust my actions and plans accordingly.

That’s real-world prepping, not end-of-the-world fiction. That sounds like it clashes with Last Light, which is end of the world fiction, after all. But Last Light is pretty real-world psychologically, all the better for it, and that’s what matters in this instance. In every instance, come to that!

Preparedness Fiction

It turns out that Halloween is A Thing.

When I finally started to research this, which was supposed to be a significant part of the blog (it’s in the blog name, after all) I really had to remember something that’s completely basic about fiction. Which is that most fiction is about much more intense, much more exaggerated versions of events than are found in everyday life.

This exaggeration for effect is true of any fiction: for instance, nowhere in East London is as mad and crazy as Albert Square in EastEnders, but it keeps millions of people gripped every week. Prepper fiction isn’t nearly as far out as it might be, in this respect: instead of Spanish ‘flu, for instance, we get a flu with a death rate that’s much worse. Instead of a proxy war in the Middle East, we get an EMP that takes out the Western world.

Think of the fiction that you know of, that refers to preparedness: it’s almost always about the end of the world, whether it’s classics like Lucifer’s Hammer by Larry Niven, or Last Light by Alex Scarrow, both of which I really like. A few people are prepared, and the rest are reacting on the fly, and if they think on their feet, they can often manage. Amongst all the death and destruction, of course.

So the preparedness that’s on view in most fiction isn’t anything like how most people, in the UK anyway, prepare for the various issues that are on their radar: flooding, unemployment. And if you keep that in mind, then some of the novels that are around can be a lot of fun, and I’ve recently come across a few comedies.

Films and TV are on the agenda too, of course: films are much more likely to be about unprepared people struggling to survive, probably because that’s more dramatic, in Hollywood terms. 2012, starring John Cusack comes to mind. The Day After Tomorrow as well. I can’t even think of any preppers in mainstream films, not preppers as I’d consider them, in any case. Unfortunately, preppers in TV are much more likely to fall into the cliché of “Doomsday Prepper”: I’ve watched a few clips on youtube, but the presentation is so offputting, it’s not a good watch.

There are very few exceptions: I remember Blackout, the Channel 4 production of a couple of years ago, and Threads, broadcast in 1984 (though prepping wouldn’t exactly have helped in that situation, to be fair).

Prepping can be usefully displayed in fiction, but it’s mostly in the background, or a question of attitude: Pride And Prejuice And Zombies and The Hunger Games, for instance, The Mandibles by Lionel Shriver, and John Christopher’s books. It takes front and centre stage in many of John Wyndham’s books, and Larry Niven’s too, as well as more modern books like the Arisen series and Emberverse.

I want to start posting reviews of films, books and authors, and I’ve been having a lot of fun offline reading and watching new ones and re-reading and re-watching old favourites. More is coming! Real Soon Now!

As I was posting this, right at Halloween, I remembered that we love being scared, Halloween is about that – even historically. It was about getting the demons and the devil out of the way so that 1st November could truly be All Saints Day, which is what it originally was. And being scared, and overcoming the fear, is what prepping fiction is all about too. An honourable tradition, and it fits very well.

If you have any recommendations, feel free to post them in the Comments, and I’ll have a look-see.

Enjoy your Halloween!