EDC: travelling in the UK

I’ve just come back from what used to be the family home, a trip to work on probate issues. It’s almost a seven hour journey each way, and on a trip like that there’s a fine balance between taking normal prepper-type precautions and weighing yourself down with kit that you’ll never need.

I took the train both ways this time, though sometimes I do it by car. So, as well as taking the things I need normally to flourish – toothpaste and dental floss, changes of clothing including a good fleece and a waterproof, my kindle, all that sort of thing, what do I take with me?

  • my keyring has some gizmos on: seatbelt cutter, a little 1” spyderco knife, a sturdy metallic whistle, an extremely sturdy, fierce-looking bottle opener in the shape of a shark, that has several uses.  I have a link below to a spyderco knife – bigger than mine, but recognisably the same line.

  • snacks. As well as my own food (intolerances of all sorts make this the best option) I carry snacks – usually oatcakes and dried fruit.

  • an all-metal pen, and a handy size anti-perspirant bottle sit ready for use, right by my antibacterial handgel.

  • a torch. I have a tiny 3” long thing, absolutely wonderful.

  • matches. Just because.

  • as much water as I’m comfortable carrying, usually only a litre, in two bottles.

  • extra cash, as much as I can stash away, in several different places.

  • there’s a tiny first aid kit, plasters, ibuprofen blah blah, nothing special. I confess, I do also put some water purification tabs in there when I’m travelling long distances.

  • toilet paper! It doesn’t need the end of the world for a UK train to run out of toilet paper.

  • a compass.

  • a windup radio.

For the last two, in particular, I have to thank Jenny Sutherland, one of the female protagonists in Last Light, Alex Scarrow’s brilliant book. Hundreds of thousands of us are en route to or from somewhere every day, and chaos, even temporary chaos, doesn’t wait for us to get safely where we’re going. Prepping gives us all a helping hand in those situations.

These are links to the most common sorts of kit that can genuinely increase your ability to survive and prosper, whatever gets thrown at you.   There’s also quite a lot of fun to be had with these: not just the reading, but the whittling with the knife, the fiddling about with the radio to listen to unusual channels, and playing endlessly with the torch.

For the return journey, my brother drove a van full of the stuff I went up there to sort and fetch – family papers and photos I’m taking care of, a patchwork quilt, my duvet, a couple of dining room chairs, some vintage glassware. He was also carrying my trolley case, and before the journey I was a bit concerned about not having my (very basic) preps with me on a seven hour which includes crossing London. But the above list of absolute essentials is so little, I could actually carry them in a day rucksack, and let the trolley case be used for boxes of the more fragile things. That was a win-win.

I know plenty of people online who’d be horrified at how short the above list is – and yes, there are some scenarios where, if I only had what was on this list, I’d be in trouble. But if prepping is also about attitude and thoughtfulness, then I’m good. I’ve taken calculated risks all my life, and they always work out, always – in the sense that if the bad thing happens, I can cope well enough with what I’ve got on hand, and adjust my actions and plans accordingly.

That’s real-world prepping, not end-of-the-world fiction. That sounds like it clashes with Last Light, which is end of the world fiction, after all. But Last Light is pretty real-world psychologically, all the better for it, and that’s what matters in this instance. In every instance, come to that!

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